Chelsea Flower Show 2012: Anniversary Parade

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Chelsea Flower Show 2012: Anniversary Parade
Chelsea Flower Show 2012: Anniversary Parade
Video: Chelsea Flower Show 2012: Anniversary Parade
Video: RHS Chelsea Flower Show 2012 2023, February
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Recently, the Chelsea Flower Show-2012 exhibition ended, which, as always, presented samples of designer gardens, nursery products and novelties of plants, works of florists, garden decorations, materials and tools for gardening, and special literature. But the main reason why thousands of visitors come to it is the garden competition, garden fashion is created here. This year it was held in four categories: Show Garden, created with strong sponsorship, and three categories of small gardens - Fresh Gardens, implying fresh, innovative gardening ideas, Artisan Gardens (Craft gardens) - ecological gardens in a natural style; and Generation Gardens.

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After reading the report to the end, you will be able to see that this year, more than ever, many expositions have been associated with the anniversaries of famous English gardens, sponsors or famous personalities. However, the main jubilee, which covered the exhibition - the 60th anniversary of the reign of Queen Elizabeth II - the "diamond jubilee", which has been celebrated in Great Britain for the fourth month, and ends on June 5 with an extensive program. Such a significant date could not be ignored at the exhibition in Chelsea, because the Queen visits it the day before the official opening and has visited it about 50 times. A photo chronicle of her visits, along with an august autograph on a botanical drawing from the world-renowned library of the Royal Horticultural Society in Lindley, was displayed at a special stand. The collection of the library contains 39 sheets with autographs of crowned heads,since 1816, with the reign of Queen Charlotte. The current visit of Elizabeth II was greeted by the exhibition with a voluminous flowerbed of annual and perennial plants, with her rotating portrait on top. Florists have also prepared their flower gifts, read about them in the article Floristic chandeliers for the Queen of England.

Well, now - let's return to the competition gardens. The celebrations of the historic gardens have returned to the classics, and this is confirmed by the victory of the regular garden The Brewin Dolphin Garden. Elements of the regular style played a major role in the layout of many gardens - straight paths, reservoirs of geometric shapes or linear canals. But sheared yews and boxwoods are buried in free English mixborders that soften the geomeric shapes. Despite the attraction of modern technologies and the search for new approaches to landscape design, the main task of English gardening at this stage is the desire to preserve traditions, while simultaneously searching for ways to modernize the garden. A space for relaxation, with soft sofa cushions on the benches, with the obligatory presence of water, sometimes turning into an open-air spa - this is a human need today.

Less attention has been paid to the issues of utilitarian use of gardens, there were practically no ornamental gardens in the expositions this year, although this topic will inevitably return in the future, due to the desire for a healthy diet and a healthy lifestyle in general. This issue is directly related to environmental problems. In connection with the droughts of recent years, the task of water conservation comes to the fore. Hence, there are more "submerged" gardens, lowered below ground level, and less modular, raised ones. And the most striking example is gardens adapted for collecting and distributing rainwater. Living roofs and walls are becoming a common design technique that allows you to increase the green area. They are used, for example, to decorate an open-air office, and it is possible that such, so far isolated, projects will become an integral part of the future.Similar proposals were presented at last year's exhibition.

Choosing plants, designers tried to include new plants in the design. We will tell about them and the plants-winners of Chelsea-2012 in the next report. I would like to note one detail now - a large number of various birches in the competitive gardens. There are many of them in English landscapes, but it seems that white and cherry textured trunks, light airy crowns of these trees are becoming even more in demand in design.

Show gardens

The Brewin Dolphin Garden (Best Show Garden, Gold Medal)

Dedication to the garden of the same name in Edinburgh, which celebrates its 250th anniversary this year. The regular construction of the exhibition and the presence of yew pyramids and sheared beech hedges bear echoes of the 19th century, when topiary art experienced a rebirth in England without losing its popularity since then. Like sentinels, the yew stands against the background of a tapestry of herbaceous perennials (poppies, onions, geraniums, katrans, nigella), symbolizing the rich history, stability and constant creative search inherent in the garden. The old entrance leads through an openwork double-leaf gate to a cobblestone platform, separated by retaining walls, which are also benches. The original stone panel opposite looks very modern.

The Brewin Dolphin Garden
The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden
The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden
The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden
The Brewin Dolphin Garden

The Brewin Dolphin Garden

Lands' End: A Rural Muse (Gold Medal)

The Rural Muse garden was created by the renowned designer of the Land's End brand clothing, Adam Frost, who has already won awards from exhibitions in Chelsea. This time he dedicated the exposition to the 19th century poet John Clair, who wrote vividly about rural nature. He owns the saying: "I find more pleasure in the field travel than in the quiet reverie of my neighbors." The garden reproduces the poet's native swampy countryside, with stone dams and forests that surrounded his home in Helpston, near Petersboro. The local stone was used for the construction of dry retaining walls, steps, walkways over a reservoir and a garden hearth. The vegetation is also traditional for these places. The space of the garden is limited on both sides by a high wall made of sheared field maple, and plantings of hornbeam create a piece of forest, an environment for shade-loving ferns.The shores of the water are decorated with willows, elderberries, sedges, geraniums, irises and aquilegia. The oak shed has a beautiful, seemingly soft, green clover roof where birds, bees and other insects can take refuge. A garden for meditation, walking and relaxation. Most likely, this garden will take its place in one of the corners of the city of Petersboro, negotiations about this are already underway.

Lands End: A Rural Muse
Lands End: A Rural Muse

Lands End: A Rural Muse

Lands End: A Rural Muse
Lands End: A Rural Muse

Lands End: A Rural Muse

Lands End: A Rural Muse
Lands End: A Rural Muse

Lands End: A Rural Muse

The M & G Garden (Gold Medal)

The popular Arts and Crafts garden showcases the beauty of natural materials (copper, oak, stone) in their natural simplicity. Constructed generally asymmetrically, it has formal elements - paths and terraces, which, combined with water, create a series of garden rooms with benches outlined by monolithic stone walls. The unifying and revitalizing element of the landscape is the sculpture of wave energy made of copper rings, as if flowing through the garden, without challenging its formalities. Sheared holly walls are balanced with forest-style plantings at the edges of the garden, while bulging umbelliferous flowers and billowing perennials soften the rigid architectural contours. This contrasting blend of traditional and modern landscape design techniques demonstrates that garden classics can stand the test of time.especially if it is being updated.

The M&G Garden
The M&G Garden

The M&G Garden

The M&G Garden
The M&G Garden

The M&G Garden

The M&G Garden
The M&G Garden

The M&G Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden (Gold Medal)

The garden of the French champagne producer Laurent-Perrier, which has sponsored the Chelsea show for 14 years. This time the exposition is dedicated to the 200th anniversary of the sponsor himself. For the decoration of the garden, exclusively handmade materials and decorations were selected, in one way or another referring to the design of the famous house of champagne. Among them are the company's logo, installed on a pedestal and vine balls, braided with French roses, buried in a flower garden. Along the inner borders of the garden there is an alley of sheared beech trees, and along the outer one there is a stream in a stone channel covered with gravel, water into which oozes from two sources in the walls and passes through tall flowerpots. An exquisite and elegant garden in pink and silver tones of mullein, centranthus, delphiniums, sage, irises, aquilegia and wormwood,filling the space between trimmed yews and boxwoods. The plants are selected to keep the garden attractive all year round and, among other things, serve as a source of cut flowers for home bouquets.

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden
The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden
The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden
The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Laurent-Perrier Bicentenary Garden

The Telegraph Garden (Gold Medal)

The garden of the multiple (2009, 2010, 2011) Chelsea exhibit winner, The Telegraph Daily, celebrates the beauty and romance of the British countryside. Inspired by the streams and springs of the uplands of North Wales and Dartmoor, it is a lakeside garden with an intricate pattern of pools and Shilmar limestone. They are surrounded by wild plant species - reeds, water irises, marigolds, white-flowered adonis and other meadow flowers and grasses. A piece of shorn hedge is interrupted by a water cascade flowing down a metal gutter. A stepped alley leads through the water to a clearing in the depths of the garden, enclosed, as if in a frame, in plantings of graceful multilateral birches, interspersed with boulders. Tranquil garden in a natural style, beautiful work with stone.

The telegraph garden
The telegraph garden

The telegraph garden

The telegraph garden
The telegraph garden

The telegraph garden

The telegraph garden
The telegraph garden

The telegraph garden

Furzey Gardens (Gold Medal)

This exhibition fully captures the spirit of the Queen's Gardens, located in the heart of the New Forest in Hampshire. Designer Chris Birdshaw worked on it, along with a team of gardeners and participants in its charity program for the rehabilitation of people with intellectual disabilities. Selected plants typical for the garden - rhododendrons, primroses, hosts, ferns, maples. All shrubs and perennials are grown in the garden, except for the large trees and hedges provided by Hillier Nursery. The garden is also characterized by a pavilion made of wood and straw, built by a local craftsman. The exposition is dedicated to the 90th anniversary of Queens Gardens, which is celebrated this year, and is aimed at disseminating the experience gained not only in the field of plant cultivation, but also in extensive charitable activities.carried out on donations.

Furzey gardens
Furzey gardens

Furzey gardens

Furzey gardens
Furzey gardens

Furzey gardens

Furzey gardens
Furzey gardens

Furzey gardens

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden (Gold Medal)

Peacetime: Forbidden Garden in the Demilitarized Zone is a sad memorial garden, created in honor of the 60th anniversary of the Korean conflict, in memory of victims and war veterans. The tense design speaks of the distant aftermath of the conflict, which resulted in a rift between North and South Korea, dividing the country into two states. An area watchtower simultaneously provides the highest viewpoint of the garden. A stream of water creeps uneasily through the disfigured landscape, defying the barriers of human conflict. Clumps of lianas stems imitate barbed wire fencing. Soldier tokens form a kind of monument to the dead. Carefully thought-out details bear the echoes of war - remnants of defensive walls, trenches, charred wood, rusty pieces of twisted metal, a lost helmet, a scattering of buttons,bottles with letters from separated people. Only the plants seem to be intact (vegetation authentic for those places is used). Here one cannot but recall the lines of Vladimir Vysotsky: "And on the neutral strip there are flowers of extraordinary beauty …"

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden
Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden
Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden
Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Quiet Time: DMZ Forbidden Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden (Gold Medal)

The project, supported by the Foundation for Teens with Cancer, is a garden that aims to focus on the maintenance of water resources and the use of natural forms in urban and suburban landscaping. Four decorative cedar wood frames attract the viewer with their warm color and rich texture. They are located so that when moving through them in a straight path, the impression of photographs, individual garden pictures, and the garden space was divided into different, but visually connected areas, appeared. A warm palette of brown irises and mullein, diluted with white flowers, enhanced by the fresh green foliage of trees and shrubs. Stone and wood combine in paving, wall decoration, benches and a semicircular sofa with cushions in the far corner of the garden. Water space,also divided into separate water areas, surrounds the track on both sides. The water flowing down the gutter makes the garden livelier. Unusual design elements include stacks of cuts of giant boulders and a custom-made garden sculpture from the same cedar wood.

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden
Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden
Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden
Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

Homebase Teenage Cancer Trust Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden (Gold Medal)

Corsican natural rocky landscape where the owner of a sponsoring company that produces organic floral essential oils for skin care grew up. The slope is framed by large trees and plants typical of the local flora. A small squat Mediterranean building made of stone has an open pergola entwined with grapes in the neighborhood (it was originally planned to put a table with armchairs under it). A sandy path leads from the house to a small lagoon, where we spotted leeches. The main color accent of the garden, according to the designer's idea, together with red poppies should have been cheerful yellow flowers on the terraces of the slope, which, unfortunately, did not have time to fully blossom for the exhibition, somewhat muffling the impression.

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden
The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden
The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden
The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The L'Occitane Immortelle Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden (Silver Plated Medal)

The Azure Water Garden is a modern interpretation of the formal Garden of Eden, reminiscent of the ancient gardens of the Alhambra in Spain. It reflects the 10-year commitment of the project sponsor, the National Bank of Canada (RBK), to protect our planet's most valuable natural resource, water, through the so-called Blue Project. The central axis of the garden is formed by shallow linear channels for collecting rainwater, in which the transverse partitions made of biomaterials are beautifully reflected. They can form the basis for the most modern formal urban gardens in the face of climate change, when water is an increasingly limited resource. At the same time, colorful plantings of plants are carried out in an informal, natural style and form a wonderful "Turkish" meadow with lilies. The combination of the main colors - blue and red,and the shape of the building at the back of the garden is in keeping with the landscape and architecture of the Puglia region of Italy, with its characteristic trulli houses covered with conical roofs of dry stonework. The design of this simple yet expressive garden is based on the personal impressions of Nigel Dunnett, lead garden design consultant for the London 2012 Olympic Games.

The RBC Blue Water Garden
The RBC Blue Water Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden
The RBC Blue Water Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden
The RBC Blue Water Garden

The RBC Blue Water Garden

A Celebration of Caravanning (Silver Gilded Medal)

The starting point for this garden was the Doris aluminum van, popular in the 1950s. The resulting retro garden is a kind of glorification of camper travel. This time the van stopped in the shade of white Chinese birches (Betula albosinensis "Fascination"), in the southern corner of the garden, which is a space for privacy and relaxation. Wooden fences divide the garden into zones. Plantings of roses and perennials - foxgloves, irises, sage, ornamental grasses - wind between them. The wooden deck and the sandy path along the stream provide a pleasant tactile sensation and welcome coolness. Undulating benches and a hammock are comfortable for relaxation and contemplation of the surrounding beauty. Even a four-legged pet will be comfortable here in a kennel covered with a green roof of strawberries and thyme. The creators tried to remind peoplethat there are many great places for families.

A Celebration of Caravanning
A Celebration of Caravanning

A Celebration of Caravanning

A Celebration of Caravanning
A Celebration of Caravanning

A Celebration of Caravanning

A Celebration of Caravanning
A Celebration of Caravanning

A Celebration of Caravanning

The Arthritis Research UK Garden (Silver Gilded Medal)

The UK Arthritis Research Center garden is inspired by the great Italian gardens of Lante and Villa d'Este. They were chosen to symbolize the renaissance of this venerable institution, celebrating its 75th anniversary, and with noble new goals for the future. The theory of human control over nature is explored using the example of divine proportions and perfect symmetry of the gardens of the Renaissance. The main theme of the garden is water, present in three elements - a series of arcuate fountains over a sheared hedge, a water cascade and a mirror-like surface, surrounded by formal Mediterranean plantings. Five majestic slender cypress trees create a magnificent backdrop in a garden perspective. The silvery flower garden is filled with Mediterranean plants - wormwood, sage, thyme, artichoke and purple swan. Despite,that the garden was not designed specifically for people with arthritis, some of its elements - raised beds and gentle slopes instead of steps - demonstrate practical ways to make gardening easier for sick people. In addition, the design includes beneficial herbs, including borage, which has a positive effect on arthritis.

The Arthritis Research UK Garden
The Arthritis Research UK Garden

The Arthritis Research UK Garden

The Arthritis Research UK Garden
The Arthritis Research UK Garden

The Arthritis Research UK Garden

The Arthritis Research UK Garden
The Arthritis Research UK Garden

The Arthritis Research UK Garden

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Fleming's (Silver Plated Medal)

A large project is presented by Fleming's Australian nursery, which is participating in the exhibition for the eighth time, together with a major sponsor - the airline Trailfinders, for which this is the sixth exhibition. No less famous is the designer Jason Hodges, a popular TV presenter, gold medalist of the Melbourne International & Garden Show (MIFGS). This is how he sees a modern Australian city garden - with a barbecue, pizza oven, a pool more like a spa, a deck terrace and even an open-air bath! Plantings reflect the multicultural approach common to gardens in Sydney and Melbourne, including, along with Australian native plants (such as New Zealand flax), impressive Spanish and Italian palms, subtropical flora and favorites of European gardens. A creative and functional garden at the same time,which is in line with the idea of ​​life in Australia, where courtyards are used for entertainment, communication, play, relaxation and rejuvenation, and where the family can feel cozy and at ease.

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings
Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings
Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings
Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

Trailfinders Australian Garden presented by Flemings

The World Vision Garden (Silver Medal)

A symbolic garden created by the World Vision UK children's charity, inspired by a visit to Bolivia. The pulsating round pool in the center of the composition hides a time capsule buried at the bottom and reminds us that there are many places on earth where children need help and should be the center of attention. The concentric structure of the garden is supported by stone terraces spiraling downward in steps. Wooden fences symbolize the help and protection that the foundation provides to those in need. The selection of plants is also not accidental: the tree ferns characteristic of South America create an atmosphere of tranquility, they are complemented by flowering perennials - Siberian iris, Borisii gravilat and Ivorine aconite, soapwort, aquilegia, cereals, small box trees.

The world vision garden
The world vision garden

The world vision garden

The world vision garden
The world vision garden

The world vision garden

The world vision garden
The world vision garden

The world vision garden

The Westland Magical Garden (Most Creative Garden, Silver Medal)

This is perhaps the largest project at the exhibition. The magic garden is a high pyramid on a metal frame with many tiers, on which, in urban conditions, you can grow fruits, vegetables, shrubs, herbaceous perennials and seasonal annuals in containers. The light greenery of the birches located on the upper tiers smooths out the rigid geometric contours of the giant bookcase, and the vines on bamboo supports add visual stability to the structure. At the foot, on the ground, there is a shady garden with ferns, hosts, rogers, and boxwood trimmed hemispheres. Delicate colored rhododendrons are housed in neutral white containers that support the white of the resting area pillows. Communication with the upper floors is carried out by stairs and an elevator on chains inside the pyramid,and daredevils can instantly descend through a wide stainless steel pipe. One cannot help but think of associations with the Egyptian pyramids, to which a certain special energy is attributed - perhaps this is partly what the creators of the project hint at, calling it a magic garden. And I also remember the famous "tree apartments" by Hundertwasser.

The westland magical garden
The westland magical garden

The westland magical garden

The westland magical garden
The westland magical garden

The westland magical garden

The westland magical garden
The westland magical garden

The westland magical garden

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow (Silver Medal)

Stylish Workspace of Tomorrow, set on the ground, but dedicated to the city roof. Here you can work sitting on a modern chair, with a smartphone or tablet. From the rain in the living room under a canopy with a green roof and bamboo flooring, hold entire conferences. There is everything you need for this, including a projection screen and a bar where you can choose from herbal teas. The workspace is surrounded by magnificent plantings of drought-resistant aromatic plants and a living wall, creating a special microclimate and a completely new urban environment. Swing chairs are provided for a short rest. The calm tones of white and silver in various objects and textures are in harmony with the silvery foliage of plants and a small amount of white flowers.This white garden redefines the work environment and inspires inspirational ideas for organizing the office of the future.

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow
Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow
Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow
Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Rooftop Workplace of Tomorrow

Continued in the article Small Gardens of Chelsea 2012.

Photo: Rita Brilliantova

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