Botanical Garden In Montpellier

Botanical Garden In Montpellier
Botanical Garden In Montpellier

Video: Botanical Garden In Montpellier

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Video: Places to see in ( Montpellier - France ) Jardin des Plantes 2023, February
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The Botanical Garden in Montpellier (Jardin des Plantes) is one of the oldest gardens in France, since it was created at the end of the 16th century (in 1593). The garden is located in a small area in the Old Town, surrounded by medieval buildings on Boulevard Henri IV, where huge clipped plane trees grow. The Mediterranean climate of this place is extremely favorable for the cultivation of thermophilic and coniferous plants, in the summer months the temperature rises to + 29 ° С, and in the winter months it does not drop below + 3 ° С. Palm trees, cypresses, box trees and other evergreen crops grow on the streets of the city.

Entrance to the garden
Entrance to the garden

Entrance to the garden

Alley with plane trees on Boulevard Henri
Alley with plane trees on Boulevard Henri

Alley with plane trees on Boulevard Henri

The founder of the botanical garden in Montpellier is the French botanist Pierre Richer de Belleval. By order of Henry IV, initially at the university (Faculte de Medecine), a garden of medicinal plants was laid, intended exclusively for the practical training of future doctors and pharmacists. However, already at the beginning of the 17th century, the garden ceased to be limited only to utilitarian functions and became a place for scientific research. In 1795, a ginkgo tree was planted in the botanical garden, symbolizing the university's medical school, and in 1804, a greenhouse was built. Over the years, the collections were replenished with exotic species, and the territory expanded as far as the city structures allowed.

At the entrance to the botanical garden, a view opens onto the parterre, the oldest territory. According to the original plan, there should be 4 labyrinths in the stalls, which, according to Christian tradition, are separated by two cross-shaped paths. However, to this day, these labyrinths have survived only partially and are arranged in the form of a hedge of boxwood formed by a haircut with palm trees in the center.

Parterre part with labyrinths
Parterre part with labyrinths

Parterre part with labyrinths

Already at the entrance, bright crimson flowers of bougainvillea glabra are clearly visible, rising along the wall. The white, fragrant flowers of Chilean jasmine (Mandevilla laxa) were fragrant nearby. The fiery red inflorescences of the Australian Callistemon linearis, also called the "scarlet horsetail", are elegant.

Bougainvillea and callistemon
Bougainvillea and callistemon

Bougainvillea and callistemon

Chilean jasmine
Chilean jasmine

Chilean jasmine

Shady alleys named after French explorers create a regular style in the garden. There is the alley of the founder of the garden - de Bellval, the alley of the botanist de Candolle, the alley of the professor of botany Cusson (R. Cusson, 1727-1783), as well as the alley of Antoine Gouan (1733-1821), a native of Montpellier, studying ferns, algae and higher plants. Alley Charles Flahault (1852-1935) is named after the professor of phytogeography, the founder of the botanical institute, formed in 1889. His bust is installed in front of the institute.

Alley de Condole
Alley de Condole

Alley de Condole

Charles Flao Alley
Charles Flao Alley

Charles Flao Alley

Monuments and sculptures gracefully rise among the trees in different corners. In the 17th century, a monument was erected to the founder of the garden, de Bellval. At the beginning of the 19th century, sculptures by many scientists appeared, including the botanist de Candolle and Count Jean-Antoine Chaptal (1756-1832), a professor of applied chemistry and a foreign honorary member of the St. Petersburg Academy of Sciences. There is a monument to the professor of botany Auguste Broussonet (1761-1807) and the taxonomist Karl Linnaeus, who also worked in this garden.

A cypress alley separates the landscaped grounds with an English garden, bamboo grove, winding paths, terracotta planters, a large lotus pool and a succulent greenhouse.

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Greenhouse
Greenhouse

Greenhouse

Succulents in a greenhouse
Succulents in a greenhouse

Succulents in a greenhouse

Currently, the botanical garden in Montpellier covers an area of ​​slightly more than 4 hectares, on which about 3 thousand plant species grow. Dense tree crowns (Zelkova serrata, Carpinus orientalis, Cephalotaxus pedunculata, Liquidambar orientalis, Cupressus lusilanica, Pinus nigra subsp. Salzmannii, Xanthoceras sorbifolia, Quercus ilex, Aesculus pavia, etc.), rushing to the sky, as if rushing to the sky, a tent filled with aromas and decorated with inflorescences of planted vines and bushes. Powerful trees are entwined with evergreen ivy; wild acanthus (Acanthus mollis) with a large original inflorescence is often found in openings in the meadows.

Cypress alley
Cypress alley

Cypress alley

Acanthus soft
Acanthus soft

Acanthus soft

A huge evergreen tree - southern caracas (Celtis australis) is striking in size. White ash (Fraxinus ornus) up to 20 m high is very decorated at flowering. It has flowers with white long and narrow petals, the same long anthers of stamens and columns. "Indian lilac" (Lagerstroemia indica) - a native of China, did not bloom with lush raspberry inflorescences on the day of our visit. The capitate shaggy inflorescences hung from the orange maclura (Maclura pomifera) - a tree up to 20 m high, originally from North America, better known as the "inedible orange", and its fruits are called "Adam's apple".

Maclura apple
Maclura apple

Maclura apple

The botanical garden, created for a utilitarian purpose, presents various food and aromatic crops (Salvia candelabrum, S. nemorosa, Phlomis lunarifolia, Ruta chalepensis, Heliotropium peruvianum). There are citrus fruits in tubs, olive, nutcracker, figs, bananas, pistachios (Pistacia mutica), Pissardi plum (Prunus cerasifera var.pissardii), feijoa (Feijoa sellowiana), laurel (Laurus nobilis) and Japanese loquat (Eriobotrya japonica) orange fruits. In an old tree with a hollow trunk, known here as the "wish tree", visitors leave notes with requests and cherished dreams.

Japanese medlar with fruits
Japanese medlar with fruits

Japanese medlar with fruits

Wish tree with treasured notes
Wish tree with treasured notes

Wish tree with treasured notes

In the depths of the garden there is an alpine slide, decorated with irises (Iris foetidissima, I. pallida), decorative carnations (Dianthus knappii), doronicum (Doronicum orientale), American Anisacanthus wrightii and various spicy-aromatic cultures. In the foreground, powerful bushes (about 80 cm high) with silvery leaves and bright yellow hemispherical inflorescences are noticeable - this is Santolina neapolitana, its synonym is pinnate santolina, which is in many ways similar to the widespread cypress santolina, which is smaller in size. Among the aromatic herbs are lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), oregano, or Turkish oregano (Origanum onites), wilted wormwood (Artemisia nutans), as well as Senecio linifolius, Careopsis lanceolata, Tanacetum corembosa and T. paradjanii.

Alpine slide with essential oil crops
Alpine slide with essential oil crops

Alpine slide with essential oil crops

Mahonia Japanese
Mahonia Japanese

Mahonia Japanese

A collection of Proteaceae has been preserved in the garden for a long time, yucca (Yucca rigida, syn. Y. rostrata, Y. Filifera) and palms (Butia bonnetii) grow. A young Acacia karoo tree with strong psychotropic properties is safely hidden behind a dense net. The path to this part of the garden leads along rocky steps past dilapidated old buildings, where a grotto and a bridge with openwork railings are built. Tall evergreen cypresses (Cupressus sempervirens) are visible along the border of the garden, chosen by the Passiflora incarnata liana as a reliable support.

Representatives of the eastern flora - Australian eucalyptus trees (Eucalyiptus parviflora), apparently planted recently, have not yet reached their maximum size. In the garden there is a Japanese paper tree (Broussonetia papirifera), or paper mulberry, valuable not only for its decorative qualities, but also for the bark, from which paper was made in ancient times. This skill has survived to this day, is used by the peoples living on the islands of the Pacific Ocean, where paper mulberry is the main material for making clothes and bedding, and its fruits and leaves are used for food. The Japanese Mahonia japonica, an evergreen tree reaching a height of 4 m, with large juicy fruits, bears fruit here.

Bamboo grove
Bamboo grove

Bamboo grove

In 1992, the Botanical Garden in Montpellier was declared a historical monument. It is not only a research center, but also a wonderful place for relaxation and inspiration for poets and artists. In the back of the garden there is a monument to the famous French writer Francois Rabelais (1494-1553), who was educated at the university and became famous for his work "Gargantua and Pantegruel".

Old part of the garden
Old part of the garden

Old part of the garden

In the shade of luxurious plants, the French poet, Nobel Prize in Literature, Paul Valery (1871-1945), who studied law at the University of Montpellier, loved to relax. On stone tablets, hung in many places of the garden, are inscribed his statements about “how good it is to walk in the garden of an ancient city and dream of pleasures”; his thoughts are that the alleys of the garden are "especially amazing for morning walks and reflections." And it's hard to disagree with this!

Tablet with verses by Paul Valerie
Tablet with verses by Paul Valerie

Tablet with verses by Paul Valerie

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